openssl on a home LAN

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openssl on a home LAN

John A. Wallace
openssl on a home LAN

I am trying to figure out whether there is any point in using openssl on a home LAN between two computers. Would that improve on security in any way?  Would I be limited in the types of OS connections? I mean, could I connect Windows with Linux? Also, if I want to make such a connection between two OS running in virtual machines, could that be done too? Thanks.

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Re: openssl on a home LAN

Gayathri Sundar-3
unless somebody is gonna tap your LAN connection, I don't see a point in using SSL. Generally its useful only when you want to send secure application data over the internet. Intranets are safe esp ur 2 home computers :).

thanks
--Gayathri

On Tue, Sep 11, 2012 at 11:36 AM, John A. Wallace <[hidden email]> wrote:

I am trying to figure out whether there is any point in using openssl on a home LAN between two computers. Would that improve on security in any way?  Would I be limited in the types of OS connections? I mean, could I connect Windows with Linux? Also, if I want to make such a connection between two OS running in virtual machines, could that be done too? Thanks.


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RE: openssl on a home LAN

Charles Mills
In reply to this post by John A. Wallace
openssl on a home LAN

Do you write computer programs, or are you a home user of personal computers?

 

If you don’t write computer programs, then using OpenSSL at the level addressed by this mailing list is not what you are looking for.

 

Some of the products you might buy might use OpenSSL “under the covers,” but you would get support generally directly from the companies that produce those products, not this mailing list.

 

Not trying to be mean or off-putting. If I have missed the mark please let me know.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 9:36 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: openssl on a home LAN

 

I am trying to figure out whether there is any point in using openssl on a home LAN between two computers. Would that improve on security in any way?  Would I be limited in the types of OS connections? I mean, could I connect Windows with Linux? Also, if I want to make such a connection between two OS running in virtual machines, could that be done too? Thanks.

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Re: openssl on a home LAN

Ted Byers
In reply to this post by John A. Wallace


On Tue, Sep 11, 2012 at 12:36 PM, John A. Wallace <[hidden email]> wrote:

I am trying to figure out whether there is any point in using openssl on a home LAN between two computers. Would that improve on security in any way?  Would I be limited in the types of OS connections? I mean, could I connect Windows with Linux? Also, if I want to make such a connection between two OS running in virtual machines, could that be done too? Thanks.

openssl, almost certainly not.  That is, unless you're planning on doing some web development and/or hosting a website on your home LAN.  In that case, you'd use openssl to make the certificates and keys necessary to support HTTPS on your web server or application server, as well as to create the CSR when it comes time to buy your domain name and then a more useful certificate signed by one fo the commercial CAs.

But, if you use wireless connections between your computers and your router/modem (whatever your ISP provided), then it is sufficient to secure that connection, which is itself just a matter of properly configuring your router and computers.  Your router probably came with instructions that tell you how to secure wireless connections between your computers and the router; possibly for Windows only, and possibly for Windows, and Linux, depending on the quality of your ISP. 

If all your computers can browse the web using your modem, it is possible to get them to connect to each other also; but that falls into the realm of knowing how to use your computers; especially how to configure them to work together.  For information about that, Google is your friend, and apart from that, your best line of support will be the support provided by whoever distributes your OS (usually mail lists supported by whichever Linux distribution you're using, and their FAQs).

Unless you're a web application programmer, you really don't need anything other than the services of the operating systems you're using.

Cheers

Ted
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RE: openssl on a home LAN

John A. Wallace
In reply to this post by Charles Mills
openssl on a home LAN

Hi.  I am not trying to be mean or something, but you may want to take a look at this page:

 

http://www.openssl.org/support/community.html

 

Focusing on the part that describes this list, one can read this about its purpose:

 

Application Development, OpenSSL Usage, Installation Problems, etc.

 

That looks clear to me in that this list would provide support for the type of question I just asked, or did I misunderstand you? J

 

Thanks.

 

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:52 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Do you write computer programs, or are you a home user of personal computers?

 

If you don’t write computer programs, then using OpenSSL at the level addressed by this mailing list is not what you are looking for.

 

Some of the products you might buy might use OpenSSL “under the covers,” but you would get support generally directly from the companies that produce those products, not this mailing list.

 

Not trying to be mean or off-putting. If I have missed the mark please let me know.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 9:36 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: openssl on a home LAN

 

I am trying to figure out whether there is any point in using openssl on a home LAN between two computers. Would that improve on security in any way?  Would I be limited in the types of OS connections? I mean, could I connect Windows with Linux? Also, if I want to make such a connection between two OS running in virtual machines, could that be done too? Thanks.

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RE: openssl on a home LAN

John A. Wallace
In reply to this post by Ted Byers

Hi, Ted.

 

What you said makes good sense and answers my question completely. I appreciate your help. Thank you.

 

John

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Ted Byers
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 1:35 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: openssl on a home LAN

 

 

On Tue, Sep 11, 2012 at 12:36 PM, John A. Wallace <[hidden email]> wrote:

I am trying to figure out whether there is any point in using openssl on a home LAN between two computers. Would that improve on security in any way?  Would I be limited in the types of OS connections? I mean, could I connect Windows with Linux? Also, if I want to make such a connection between two OS running in virtual machines, could that be done too? Thanks.

openssl, almost certainly not.  That is, unless you're planning on doing some web development and/or hosting a website on your home LAN.  In that case, you'd use openssl to make the certificates and keys necessary to support HTTPS on your web server or application server, as well as to create the CSR when it comes time to buy your domain name and then a more useful certificate signed by one fo the commercial CAs.

But, if you use wireless connections between your computers and your router/modem (whatever your ISP provided), then it is sufficient to secure that connection, which is itself just a matter of properly configuring your router and computers.  Your router probably came with instructions that tell you how to secure wireless connections between your computers and the router; possibly for Windows only, and possibly for Windows, and Linux, depending on the quality of your ISP. 

If all your computers can browse the web using your modem, it is possible to get them to connect to each other also; but that falls into the realm of knowing how to use your computers; especially how to configure them to work together.  For information about that, Google is your friend, and apart from that, your best line of support will be the support provided by whoever distributes your OS (usually mail lists supported by whichever Linux distribution you're using, and their FAQs).

Unless you're a web application programmer, you really don't need anything other than the services of the operating systems you're using.

Cheers

Ted

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RE: openssl on a home LAN

Charles Mills
In reply to this post by John A. Wallace
openssl on a home LAN

Right. Are you an application developer? In other words, do you write computer programs? Does the following mean anything to you?

 

int main(int argc, char *argv[])

{

printf(“hello world\n”);

return 0;

}

 

Or alternatively, are you a Web site operator? Do you host a Web site that others access?

 

If the answer to both of these questions is No, then you are welcome to hang out here but the answer to your original question, “whether there is any point in using openssl” is No.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:07 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Hi.  I am not trying to be mean or something, but you may want to take a look at this page:

 

http://www.openssl.org/support/community.html

 

Focusing on the part that describes this list, one can read this about its purpose:

 

Application Development, OpenSSL Usage, Installation Problems, etc.

 

That looks clear to me in that this list would provide support for the type of question I just asked, or did I misunderstand you? J

 

Thanks.

 

 

From: [hidden email] [hidden email] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:52 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Do you write computer programs, or are you a home user of personal computers?

 

If you don’t write computer programs, then using OpenSSL at the level addressed by this mailing list is not what you are looking for.

 

Some of the products you might buy might use OpenSSL “under the covers,” but you would get support generally directly from the companies that produce those products, not this mailing list.

 

Not trying to be mean or off-putting. If I have missed the mark please let me know.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 9:36 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: openssl on a home LAN

 

I am trying to figure out whether there is any point in using openssl on a home LAN between two computers. Would that improve on security in any way?  Would I be limited in the types of OS connections? I mean, could I connect Windows with Linux? Also, if I want to make such a connection between two OS running in virtual machines, could that be done too? Thanks.

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RE: openssl on a home LAN

Erik Tkal
In reply to this post by John A. Wallace
openssl on a home LAN

You don’t “use OpenSSL” on a home LAN, you use applications or OS layers that might use OpenSSL in their implementation.  In general OpenSSL is a toolkit that provides cryptography and SSL/TLS implementations.

 

I think you have to be more specific about what you mean by phrases like “connect Windows with Linux”.  Do you mean file sharing?  Remote desktop?  Backup solutions?  Remote command prompts?  Each usage will use some sort of enabling technology that you would have to research to determine its security, and many of these solutions might just as well already be using OpenSSL.


....................................
Erik Tkal
Juniper OAC/UAC/Pulse Development

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:36 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: openssl on a home LAN

 

I am trying to figure out whether there is any point in using openssl on a home LAN between two computers. Would that improve on security in any way?  Would I be limited in the types of OS connections? I mean, could I connect Windows with Linux? Also, if I want to make such a connection between two OS running in virtual machines, could that be done too? Thanks.

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RE: openssl on a home LAN

John A. Wallace
In reply to this post by Charles Mills
openssl on a home LAN

Charlie,

 

Frankly, you condescending manner is starting to annoy me, considerably.  Furthermore, your name is not on this page as one of the moderators of this group:   http://www.openssl.org/about/

 

Moreover, I don’t believe I need your permission to “hang out here”.  You need to read the link I provided you all the way to the end, it says that this group is for

 

1.       Developers

2.       OpenSSL usage

3.       Installation problems

 

Now inasmuch as my question pertained to “OpenSSL Usage”, i.e., number 2 above, well I think that makes my asking it a legitimate question for this group. If you don’t like it, you can just learn to use your reading program and ignore me. Thank you very much.   J

 

John

 

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 3:22 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Right. Are you an application developer? In other words, do you write computer programs? Does the following mean anything to you?

 

int main(int argc, char *argv[])

{

printf(“hello world\n”);

return 0;

}

 

Or alternatively, are you a Web site operator? Do you host a Web site that others access?

 

If the answer to both of these questions is No, then you are welcome to hang out here but the answer to your original question, “whether there is any point in using openssl” is No.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:07 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Hi.  I am not trying to be mean or something, but you may want to take a look at this page:

 

http://www.openssl.org/support/community.html

 

Focusing on the part that describes this list, one can read this about its purpose:

 

Application Development, OpenSSL Usage, Installation Problems, etc.

 

That looks clear to me in that this list would provide support for the type of question I just asked, or did I misunderstand you? J

 

Thanks.

 

 

From: [hidden email] [hidden email] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:52 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Do you write computer programs, or are you a home user of personal computers?

 

If you don’t write computer programs, then using OpenSSL at the level addressed by this mailing list is not what you are looking for.

 

Some of the products you might buy might use OpenSSL “under the covers,” but you would get support generally directly from the companies that produce those products, not this mailing list.

 

Not trying to be mean or off-putting. If I have missed the mark please let me know.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 9:36 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: openssl on a home LAN

 

I am trying to figure out whether there is any point in using openssl on a home LAN between two computers. Would that improve on security in any way?  Would I be limited in the types of OS connections? I mean, could I connect Windows with Linux? Also, if I want to make such a connection between two OS running in virtual machines, could that be done too? Thanks.

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Re: openssl on a home LAN

Gayathri Sundar-3
Hi John,

I definitely do not agree with charles's email, but what I think he meant is, you need to write programs to use OpenSSL. Its an installable library, which you need to invoke from your application using its exposed APIs and recompile your code, link OpenSSL library and execute for it to work. Its not a SSL solution if that is what your looking for.

Just installing OpenSSL is not going to give u SSL.

Thanks
--Gayathri

On Tue, Sep 11, 2012 at 8:36 PM, John A. Wallace <[hidden email]> wrote:

Charlie,

 

Frankly, you condescending manner is starting to annoy me, considerably.  Furthermore, your name is not on this page as one of the moderators of this group:   http://www.openssl.org/about/

 

Moreover, I don’t believe I need your permission to “hang out here”.  You need to read the link I provided you all the way to the end, it says that this group is for

 

1.       Developers

2.       OpenSSL usage

3.       Installation problems

 

Now inasmuch as my question pertained to “OpenSSL Usage”, i.e., number 2 above, well I think that makes my asking it a legitimate question for this group. If you don’t like it, you can just learn to use your reading program and ignore me. Thank you very much.   J

 

John

 

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 3:22 PM


To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Right. Are you an application developer? In other words, do you write computer programs? Does the following mean anything to you?

 

int main(int argc, char *argv[])

{

printf(“hello world\n”);

return 0;

}

 

Or alternatively, are you a Web site operator? Do you host a Web site that others access?

 

If the answer to both of these questions is No, then you are welcome to hang out here but the answer to your original question, “whether there is any point in using openssl” is No.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:07 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Hi.  I am not trying to be mean or something, but you may want to take a look at this page:

 

http://www.openssl.org/support/community.html

 

Focusing on the part that describes this list, one can read this about its purpose:

 

Application Development, OpenSSL Usage, Installation Problems, etc.

 

That looks clear to me in that this list would provide support for the type of question I just asked, or did I misunderstand you? J

 

Thanks.

 

 

From: [hidden email] [hidden email] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:52 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Do you write computer programs, or are you a home user of personal computers?

 

If you don’t write computer programs, then using OpenSSL at the level addressed by this mailing list is not what you are looking for.

 

Some of the products you might buy might use OpenSSL “under the covers,” but you would get support generally directly from the companies that produce those products, not this mailing list.

 

Not trying to be mean or off-putting. If I have missed the mark please let me know.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 9:36 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: openssl on a home LAN

 

I am trying to figure out whether there is any point in using openssl on a home LAN between two computers. Would that improve on security in any way?  Would I be limited in the types of OS connections? I mean, could I connect Windows with Linux? Also, if I want to make such a connection between two OS running in virtual machines, could that be done too? Thanks.


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RE: openssl on a home LAN

Charles Mills
In reply to this post by John A. Wallace
openssl on a home LAN

A thousand pardons. You totally misapprehend my intent. I guess that’s a classic hazard of e-mail, isn’t it?

 

You’re right, I make no pretense of being a moderator. It’s a forum, and I’m just a citizen trying to help you out by answering the question you asked in the forum.

 

I won’t bother you again.

 

P.S. The name is Charles.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 6:37 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Charlie,

 

Frankly, you condescending manner is starting to annoy me, considerably.  Furthermore, your name is not on this page as one of the moderators of this group:   http://www.openssl.org/about/

 

Moreover, I don’t believe I need your permission to “hang out here”.  You need to read the link I provided you all the way to the end, it says that this group is for

 

1.       Developers

2.       OpenSSL usage

3.       Installation problems

 

Now inasmuch as my question pertained to “OpenSSL Usage”, i.e., number 2 above, well I think that makes my asking it a legitimate question for this group. If you don’t like it, you can just learn to use your reading program and ignore me. Thank you very much.   J

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RE: openssl on a home LAN

John A. Wallace
openssl on a home LAN

No problem and no hard feelings. Take care and have a good day. Thanks.

 

 

John

 

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 11:14 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

A thousand pardons. You totally misapprehend my intent. I guess that’s a classic hazard of e-mail, isn’t it?

 

You’re right, I make no pretense of being a moderator. It’s a forum, and I’m just a citizen trying to help you out by answering the question you asked in the forum.

 

I won’t bother you again.

 

P.S. The name is Charles.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 6:37 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Charlie,

 

Frankly, you condescending manner is starting to annoy me, considerably.  Furthermore, your name is not on this page as one of the moderators of this group:   http://www.openssl.org/about/

 

Moreover, I don’t believe I need your permission to “hang out here”.  You need to read the link I provided you all the way to the end, it says that this group is for

 

1.       Developers

2.       OpenSSL usage

3.       Installation problems

 

Now inasmuch as my question pertained to “OpenSSL Usage”, i.e., number 2 above, well I think that makes my asking it a legitimate question for this group. If you don’t like it, you can just learn to use your reading program and ignore me. Thank you very much.   J

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RE: openssl on a home LAN

John A. Wallace
In reply to this post by Gayathri Sundar-3

Hi, Gayathri,

 

I appreciate the clarification. It was helpful, yes. I think my confusion stemmed from the fact that in the past while installing one or another program, I found it to say that “OpenSSL must be installed on your system for this program to work properly.” Okay, I think I got it now, the light has made it into my obstinate, thick skull.  Clarity is a beautiful thing, thank you.

 

John

 

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Gayathri Sundar
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 10:07 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: openssl on a home LAN

 

Hi John,

 

I definitely do not agree with charles's email, but what I think he meant is, you need to write programs to use OpenSSL. Its an installable library, which you need to invoke from your application using its exposed APIs and recompile your code, link OpenSSL library and execute for it to work. Its not a SSL solution if that is what your looking for.

 

Just installing OpenSSL is not going to give u SSL.

 

Thanks

--Gayathri

On Tue, Sep 11, 2012 at 8:36 PM, John A. Wallace <[hidden email]> wrote:

Charlie,

 

Frankly, you condescending manner is starting to annoy me, considerably.  Furthermore, your name is not on this page as one of the moderators of this group:   http://www.openssl.org/about/

 

Moreover, I don’t believe I need your permission to “hang out here”.  You need to read the link I provided you all the way to the end, it says that this group is for

 

1.       Developers

2.       OpenSSL usage

3.       Installation problems

 

Now inasmuch as my question pertained to “OpenSSL Usage”, i.e., number 2 above, well I think that makes my asking it a legitimate question for this group. If you don’t like it, you can just learn to use your reading program and ignore me. Thank you very much.   J

 

John

 

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 3:22 PM


To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Right. Are you an application developer? In other words, do you write computer programs? Does the following mean anything to you?

 

int main(int argc, char *argv[])

{

printf(“hello world\n”);

return 0;

}

 

Or alternatively, are you a Web site operator? Do you host a Web site that others access?

 

If the answer to both of these questions is No, then you are welcome to hang out here but the answer to your original question, “whether there is any point in using openssl” is No.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:07 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Hi.  I am not trying to be mean or something, but you may want to take a look at this page:

 

http://www.openssl.org/support/community.html

 

Focusing on the part that describes this list, one can read this about its purpose:

 

Application Development, OpenSSL Usage, Installation Problems, etc.

 

That looks clear to me in that this list would provide support for the type of question I just asked, or did I misunderstand you? J

 

Thanks.

 

 

From: [hidden email] [hidden email] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:52 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Do you write computer programs, or are you a home user of personal computers?

 

If you don’t write computer programs, then using OpenSSL at the level addressed by this mailing list is not what you are looking for.

 

Some of the products you might buy might use OpenSSL “under the covers,” but you would get support generally directly from the companies that produce those products, not this mailing list.

 

Not trying to be mean or off-putting. If I have missed the mark please let me know.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 9:36 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: openssl on a home LAN

 

I am trying to figure out whether there is any point in using openssl on a home LAN between two computers. Would that improve on security in any way?  Would I be limited in the types of OS connections? I mean, could I connect Windows with Linux? Also, if I want to make such a connection between two OS running in virtual machines, could that be done too? Thanks.

 

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RE: openssl on a home LAN

Charles Mills
In reply to this post by John A. Wallace
openssl on a home LAN

Thanks. Take care. Good luck with your home LAN.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 9:51 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

No problem and no hard feelings. Take care and have a good day. Thanks.

 

 

John

 

 

From: [hidden email] [hidden email] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 11:14 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

A thousand pardons. You totally misapprehend my intent. I guess that’s a classic hazard of e-mail, isn’t it?

 

You’re right, I make no pretense of being a moderator. It’s a forum, and I’m just a citizen trying to help you out by answering the question you asked in the forum.

 

I won’t bother you again.

 

P.S. The name is Charles.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 6:37 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Charlie,

 

Frankly, you condescending manner is starting to annoy me, considerably.  Furthermore, your name is not on this page as one of the moderators of this group:   http://www.openssl.org/about/

 

Moreover, I don’t believe I need your permission to “hang out here”.  You need to read the link I provided you all the way to the end, it says that this group is for

 

1.       Developers

2.       OpenSSL usage

3.       Installation problems

 

Now inasmuch as my question pertained to “OpenSSL Usage”, i.e., number 2 above, well I think that makes my asking it a legitimate question for this group. If you don’t like it, you can just learn to use your reading program and ignore me. Thank you very much.   J

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RE: openssl on a home LAN

Steven Madwin
In reply to this post by John A. Wallace

Hi John,

 

As an aside to what Gayathri said, I’m not a developer, but I have used OpenSSL to create a complete PKI universe for testing. Using the pre-compiled, downloadable installer I’ve been able to create Root certificates, Intermediate CA certificates, and end-entity certificates of all shapes and sizes (e.g. DSA, RSA, EC with varying key sizes). I’ve also used it to manage revocation checking by creating CRLs and running it as an (admittedly, a very light weight) OCSP server. I even used it once to create an SSL certificate for an internal server :)

 

My point is, although the primary use seems to be incorporating the OpenSSL libraries into your compiled code so you can take advantage of its cryptographic capabilities, even someone who is not a computer scientist can use OpenSSL from the command line to do a lot of work. What it really boils down to is what is it that you are looking to do?

 

Steve

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 9:58 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Hi, Gayathri,

 

I appreciate the clarification. It was helpful, yes. I think my confusion stemmed from the fact that in the past while installing one or another program, I found it to say that “OpenSSL must be installed on your system for this program to work properly.” Okay, I think I got it now, the light has made it into my obstinate, thick skull.  Clarity is a beautiful thing, thank you.

 

John

 

 

From: [hidden email] [hidden email] On Behalf Of Gayathri Sundar
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 10:07 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: openssl on a home LAN

 

Hi John,

 

I definitely do not agree with charles's email, but what I think he meant is, you need to write programs to use OpenSSL. Its an installable library, which you need to invoke from your application using its exposed APIs and recompile your code, link OpenSSL library and execute for it to work. Its not a SSL solution if that is what your looking for.

 

Just installing OpenSSL is not going to give u SSL.

 

Thanks

--Gayathri

On Tue, Sep 11, 2012 at 8:36 PM, John A. Wallace <[hidden email]> wrote:

Charlie,

 

Frankly, you condescending manner is starting to annoy me, considerably.  Furthermore, your name is not on this page as one of the moderators of this group:   http://www.openssl.org/about/

 

Moreover, I don’t believe I need your permission to “hang out here”.  You need to read the link I provided you all the way to the end, it says that this group is for

 

1.       Developers

2.       OpenSSL usage

3.       Installation problems

 

Now inasmuch as my question pertained to “OpenSSL Usage”, i.e., number 2 above, well I think that makes my asking it a legitimate question for this group. If you don’t like it, you can just learn to use your reading program and ignore me. Thank you very much.   J

 

John

 

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 3:22 PM


To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Right. Are you an application developer? In other words, do you write computer programs? Does the following mean anything to you?

 

int main(int argc, char *argv[])

{

printf(“hello world\n”);

return 0;

}

 

Or alternatively, are you a Web site operator? Do you host a Web site that others access?

 

If the answer to both of these questions is No, then you are welcome to hang out here but the answer to your original question, “whether there is any point in using openssl” is No.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:07 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Hi.  I am not trying to be mean or something, but you may want to take a look at this page:

 

http://www.openssl.org/support/community.html

 

Focusing on the part that describes this list, one can read this about its purpose:

 

Application Development, OpenSSL Usage, Installation Problems, etc.

 

That looks clear to me in that this list would provide support for the type of question I just asked, or did I misunderstand you? J

 

Thanks.

 

 

From: [hidden email] [hidden email] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:52 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Do you write computer programs, or are you a home user of personal computers?

 

If you don’t write computer programs, then using OpenSSL at the level addressed by this mailing list is not what you are looking for.

 

Some of the products you might buy might use OpenSSL “under the covers,” but you would get support generally directly from the companies that produce those products, not this mailing list.

 

Not trying to be mean or off-putting. If I have missed the mark please let me know.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 9:36 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: openssl on a home LAN

 

I am trying to figure out whether there is any point in using openssl on a home LAN between two computers. Would that improve on security in any way?  Would I be limited in the types of OS connections? I mean, could I connect Windows with Linux? Also, if I want to make such a connection between two OS running in virtual machines, could that be done too? Thanks.

 


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Re: openssl on a home LAN

Gayathri Sundar-3
Charles,

I think he wanted to use SSL for data transfer between 2 computers. What you have used is the PKI infrastructure.
Infact even for SSL there are sample client and server codes in the examples folder, but that does not hook into your application.

Thanks
--Gayathri

On Wed, Sep 12, 2012 at 1:29 PM, Steven Madwin <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi John,

 

As an aside to what Gayathri said, I’m not a developer, but I have used OpenSSL to create a complete PKI universe for testing. Using the pre-compiled, downloadable installer I’ve been able to create Root certificates, Intermediate CA certificates, and end-entity certificates of all shapes and sizes (e.g. DSA, RSA, EC with varying key sizes). I’ve also used it to manage revocation checking by creating CRLs and running it as an (admittedly, a very light weight) OCSP server. I even used it once to create an SSL certificate for an internal server :)

 

My point is, although the primary use seems to be incorporating the OpenSSL libraries into your compiled code so you can take advantage of its cryptographic capabilities, even someone who is not a computer scientist can use OpenSSL from the command line to do a lot of work. What it really boils down to is what is it that you are looking to do?

 

Steve

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 9:58 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Hi, Gayathri,

 

I appreciate the clarification. It was helpful, yes. I think my confusion stemmed from the fact that in the past while installing one or another program, I found it to say that “OpenSSL must be installed on your system for this program to work properly.” Okay, I think I got it now, the light has made it into my obstinate, thick skull.  Clarity is a beautiful thing, thank you.

 

John

 

 

From: [hidden email] [hidden email] On Behalf Of Gayathri Sundar
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 10:07 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: openssl on a home LAN

 

Hi John,

 

I definitely do not agree with charles's email, but what I think he meant is, you need to write programs to use OpenSSL. Its an installable library, which you need to invoke from your application using its exposed APIs and recompile your code, link OpenSSL library and execute for it to work. Its not a SSL solution if that is what your looking for.

 

Just installing OpenSSL is not going to give u SSL.

 

Thanks

--Gayathri

On Tue, Sep 11, 2012 at 8:36 PM, John A. Wallace <[hidden email]> wrote:

Charlie,

 

Frankly, you condescending manner is starting to annoy me, considerably.  Furthermore, your name is not on this page as one of the moderators of this group:   http://www.openssl.org/about/

 

Moreover, I don’t believe I need your permission to “hang out here”.  You need to read the link I provided you all the way to the end, it says that this group is for

 

1.       Developers

2.       OpenSSL usage

3.       Installation problems

 

Now inasmuch as my question pertained to “OpenSSL Usage”, i.e., number 2 above, well I think that makes my asking it a legitimate question for this group. If you don’t like it, you can just learn to use your reading program and ignore me. Thank you very much.   J

 

John

 

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 3:22 PM


To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Right. Are you an application developer? In other words, do you write computer programs? Does the following mean anything to you?

 

int main(int argc, char *argv[])

{

printf(“hello world\n”);

return 0;

}

 

Or alternatively, are you a Web site operator? Do you host a Web site that others access?

 

If the answer to both of these questions is No, then you are welcome to hang out here but the answer to your original question, “whether there is any point in using openssl” is No.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:07 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Hi.  I am not trying to be mean or something, but you may want to take a look at this page:

 

http://www.openssl.org/support/community.html

 

Focusing on the part that describes this list, one can read this about its purpose:

 

Application Development, OpenSSL Usage, Installation Problems, etc.

 

That looks clear to me in that this list would provide support for the type of question I just asked, or did I misunderstand you? J

 

Thanks.

 

 

From: [hidden email] [hidden email] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:52 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Do you write computer programs, or are you a home user of personal computers?

 

If you don’t write computer programs, then using OpenSSL at the level addressed by this mailing list is not what you are looking for.

 

Some of the products you might buy might use OpenSSL “under the covers,” but you would get support generally directly from the companies that produce those products, not this mailing list.

 

Not trying to be mean or off-putting. If I have missed the mark please let me know.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 9:36 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: openssl on a home LAN

 

I am trying to figure out whether there is any point in using openssl on a home LAN between two computers. Would that improve on security in any way?  Would I be limited in the types of OS connections? I mean, could I connect Windows with Linux? Also, if I want to make such a connection between two OS running in virtual machines, could that be done too? Thanks.

 


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RE: openssl on a home LAN

Charles Mills

It’s true.

 

I think “you are a Web developer and need to generate certificates for your Web site” was mentioned.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Gayathri Sundar
Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2012 6:01 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: openssl on a home LAN

 

Charles,

 

I think he wanted to use SSL for data transfer between 2 computers. What you have used is the PKI infrastructure.

Infact even for SSL there are sample client and server codes in the examples folder, but that does not hook into your application.

 

Thanks

--Gayathri

On Wed, Sep 12, 2012 at 1:29 PM, Steven Madwin <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi John,

 

As an aside to what Gayathri said, I’m not a developer, but I have used OpenSSL to create a complete PKI universe for testing. Using the pre-compiled, downloadable installer I’ve been able to create Root certificates, Intermediate CA certificates, and end-entity certificates of all shapes and sizes (e.g. DSA, RSA, EC with varying key sizes). I’ve also used it to manage revocation checking by creating CRLs and running it as an (admittedly, a very light weight) OCSP server. I even used it once to create an SSL certificate for an internal server :)

 

My point is, although the primary use seems to be incorporating the OpenSSL libraries into your compiled code so you can take advantage of its cryptographic capabilities, even someone who is not a computer scientist can use OpenSSL from the command line to do a lot of work. What it really boils down to is what is it that you are looking to do?

 

Steve

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 9:58 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Hi, Gayathri,

 

I appreciate the clarification. It was helpful, yes. I think my confusion stemmed from the fact that in the past while installing one or another program, I found it to say that “OpenSSL must be installed on your system for this program to work properly.” Okay, I think I got it now, the light has made it into my obstinate, thick skull.  Clarity is a beautiful thing, thank you.

 

John

 

 

From: [hidden email] [hidden email] On Behalf Of Gayathri Sundar
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 10:07 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: openssl on a home LAN

 

Hi John,

 

I definitely do not agree with charles's email, but what I think he meant is, you need to write programs to use OpenSSL. Its an installable library, which you need to invoke from your application using its exposed APIs and recompile your code, link OpenSSL library and execute for it to work. Its not a SSL solution if that is what your looking for.

 

Just installing OpenSSL is not going to give u SSL.

 

Thanks

--Gayathri

On Tue, Sep 11, 2012 at 8:36 PM, John A. Wallace <[hidden email]> wrote:

Charlie,

 

Frankly, you condescending manner is starting to annoy me, considerably.  Furthermore, your name is not on this page as one of the moderators of this group:   http://www.openssl.org/about/

 

Moreover, I don’t believe I need your permission to “hang out here”.  You need to read the link I provided you all the way to the end, it says that this group is for

 

1.       Developers

2.       OpenSSL usage

3.       Installation problems

 

Now inasmuch as my question pertained to “OpenSSL Usage”, i.e., number 2 above, well I think that makes my asking it a legitimate question for this group. If you don’t like it, you can just learn to use your reading program and ignore me. Thank you very much.   J

 

John

 

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 3:22 PM


To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Right. Are you an application developer? In other words, do you write computer programs? Does the following mean anything to you?

 

int main(int argc, char *argv[])

{

printf(“hello world\n”);

return 0;

}

 

Or alternatively, are you a Web site operator? Do you host a Web site that others access?

 

If the answer to both of these questions is No, then you are welcome to hang out here but the answer to your original question, “whether there is any point in using openssl” is No.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:07 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Hi.  I am not trying to be mean or something, but you may want to take a look at this page:

 

http://www.openssl.org/support/community.html

 

Focusing on the part that describes this list, one can read this about its purpose:

 

Application Development, OpenSSL Usage, Installation Problems, etc.

 

That looks clear to me in that this list would provide support for the type of question I just asked, or did I misunderstand you? J

 

Thanks.

 

 

From: [hidden email] [hidden email] On Behalf Of Charles Mills
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:52 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: openssl on a home LAN

 

Do you write computer programs, or are you a home user of personal computers?

 

If you don’t write computer programs, then using OpenSSL at the level addressed by this mailing list is not what you are looking for.

 

Some of the products you might buy might use OpenSSL “under the covers,” but you would get support generally directly from the companies that produce those products, not this mailing list.

 

Not trying to be mean or off-putting. If I have missed the mark please let me know.

 

Charles

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of John A. Wallace
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 9:36 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: openssl on a home LAN

 

I am trying to figure out whether there is any point in using openssl on a home LAN between two computers. Would that improve on security in any way?  Would I be limited in the types of OS connections? I mean, could I connect Windows with Linux? Also, if I want to make such a connection between two OS running in virtual machines, could that be done too? Thanks.